Category: Arduino

Arduino C++ examples tutorial using Duemilanove (I)

This entry is part 5 of 5 in the series Cheapest robot (Arduino)

This is the first example in a serie of cheap (absolutely free and cheap) articles to get some basic and practical C++ knowledge. It will references the great explanations provided at www.cplusplus.com C++ tutorial. Using Arduino Duemilanove (well, really it’s a Funduino).

Here you can download The file with the code, and you can find links to a lot of free tutorials, courses and books to learn C++ here.

// C++ crash tutorial with Arduino Duemilanove.

// First example: http://softwaresouls.com/softwaresouls/2013/06/23/c-crash-tutorial-using-robotis-cm-900-board-and-ide-i/

/*
Hello World shows messages on construction and destruction
Also it lets you to salute.
Showing always its assigned identifiction number MyId
*/
class HelloWorld
{
private:
int myId; //Object identification num ber

public:

// class constructor http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/classes/
HelloWorld(char *message, byte id)
{
myId=id;
Serial.print(message);
printId();
}

// class destructor http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/classes/
~HelloWorld()
{
Serial.print ("Destructing object: ");
printId();
}

void printId()
{
Serial.print(" ID:");
Serial.println(myId);
Serial.println(" ");
}

void Salute(char *name)
{
Serial.print("Hi!, ");
Serial.println(name);
Serial.print("Regards from object: ");
printId();
}
};

/*
void setup() function it's only executed one time at the start of the execution.
It is called from a hidden main() function in the Ronbotis CM-900 IDE core.

\ROBOTIS-v0.9.9\hardware\robotis\cores\robotis\main.cpp
Note: "while (1)" is a forevr loop ( http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/control ):

(Basic structure http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/program_structure/)

int main(void) {
setup();

while (1) {
loop();
}
return 0;
}
*/
void setup()
{
Serial.begin(57600); //initialize serial USB connection
delay(3000); //We will wait 3 seconds, let the user open (Control+Shift+M) the Monitor serial console
}

//We will not see neither the construction nor the destruction of this global object because serial port it's not still initiated
HelloWorld hw0("construction object", 0); //Object construction http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/classes/

// A counter to see progress and launch events
int iterationCounter=0; //An integer variable to count iterations http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/variables

// void loop() will be executing the sentences it contains while CM-900 is on.
void loop()
{
// Lets's show only the first 5 iterations http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/control/
if (iterationCounter<5)
{
Serial.print("starting iteration #");
Serial.println(++iterationCounter); // firts, iterationCounter is incremented and then printed

// We will see the consttructiona and destruction messages from this local (inside the loop function) object. Object construction http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/classes/
HelloWorld hw1("constructing object", 1);
hw1.Salute("Joe");

if (iterationCounter==3)
{
// We will see the consttruction and destruction messages from this local (inside the "if" block inside the "loop" function) object. Objet construction http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/classes/
HelloWorld hw2("constructing object", 2);
hw2.Salute("Jones");
} // Objet hw2 destruction http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/classes/

//Let's show that object hw0 is alive
hw0.Salute("Pepe");

Serial.print("ending iteration #");
Serial.println(iterationCounter++); // first cpunter is printed, then incremented.
} // Objet hw1 destruction http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/classes/
} // Program end. Objet hw0 destruction http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/classes/

Arduino LCD 1602 (16×2) display

This entry is part 4 of 5 in the series Cheapest robot (Arduino)

Another little pearl from www.dx.com is the Arduino compatible LCD 1602 (16 characters each of the 2 rows) display:

20130616_091530

It’s really cheap, 6$/4.5€, works very fine and it’s easy to use! I will use as a handy debug display and little dashboard (it has 6 buttons at the bottom) while on field robots debugging, but this wioll be a near post with the sourcecode (that also will be a order receiver to program a Rapsberry Pi to control a robot using and Arduino Funduino Duemilanove.)

Arduino LCD text

Two easy examples from the Arduino IDE wondeful examples, it’s important that you notice that the initialization sentence should be:

LiquidCrystal lcd(8, 9, 4, 5, 6, 7);

The hello world

/*
  LiquidCrystal Library - Hello World
 
 Demonstrates the use a 16x2 LCD display.  The LiquidCrystal
 library works with all LCD displays that are compatible with the 
 Hitachi HD44780 driver. There are many of them out there, and you
 can usually tell them by the 16-pin interface.
 
 This sketch prints "Hello World!" to the LCD
 and shows the time.
 
  The circuit:
 * LCD RS pin to digital pin 12
 * LCD Enable pin to digital pin 11
 * LCD D4 pin to digital pin 5
 * LCD D5 pin to digital pin 4
 * LCD D6 pin to digital pin 3
 * LCD D7 pin to digital pin 2
 * LCD R/W pin to ground
 * 10K resistor:
 * ends to +5V and ground
 * wiper to LCD VO pin (pin 3)
 
 Library originally added 18 Apr 2008
 by David A. Mellis
 library modified 5 Jul 2009
 by Limor Fried (http://www.ladyada.net)
 example added 9 Jul 2009
 by Tom Igoe
 modified 22 Nov 2010
 by Tom Igoe
 
 This example code is in the public domain.

 http://www.arduino.cc/en/Tutorial/LiquidCrystal
 */

// include the library code:
#include <LiquidCrystal.h>

// initialize the library with the numbers of the interface pins
//LiquidCrystal lcd(12, 11, 5, 4, 3, 2);
 LiquidCrystal lcd(8, 9, 4, 5, 6, 7);

void setup() {
  // set up the LCD's number of columns and rows: 
  lcd.begin(16, 2);
  // Print a message to the LCD.
  lcd.print("Te, amo, Nuriitaa!");
}

void loop() {
  // set the cursor to column 0, line 1
  // (note: line 1 is the second row, since counting begins with 0):
  lcd.setCursor(0, 1);
  // print the number of seconds since reset:
  lcd.print(millis()/1000);
}

Testing buttons

//Sample using LiquidCrystal library
#include <LiquidCrystal.h>
 
/*******************************************************
 
This program will test the LCD panel and the buttons
Mark Bramwell, July 2010
 
********************************************************/
 
// select the pins used on the LCD panel
LiquidCrystal lcd(8, 9, 4, 5, 6, 7);
 
// define some values used by the panel and buttons
int lcd_key     = 0;
int adc_key_in  = 0;
#define btnRIGHT  0
#define btnUP     1
#define btnDOWN   2
#define btnLEFT   3
#define btnSELECT 4
#define btnNONE   5
 
// read the buttons
int read_LCD_buttons()
{
 adc_key_in = analogRead(0);      // read the value from the sensor
 // my buttons when read are centered at these valies: 0, 144, 329, 504, 741
 // we add approx 50 to those values and check to see if we are close
 if (adc_key_in > 1000) return btnNONE; // We make this the 1st option for speed reasons since it will be the most likely result
 if (adc_key_in < 50)   return btnRIGHT; 
 if (adc_key_in < 195)  return btnUP;
 if (adc_key_in < 380)  return btnDOWN;
 if (adc_key_in < 555)  return btnLEFT;
 if (adc_key_in < 790)  return btnSELECT;  
 return btnNONE;  // when all others fail, return this...
}
 
void setup()
{
 lcd.begin(16, 2);              // start the library
 lcd.setCursor(0,0);
 lcd.print("Push the buttons"); // print a simple message
}
  
void loop()
{
 lcd.setCursor(9,1);            // move cursor to second line "1" and 9 spaces over
 lcd.print(millis()/1000);      // display seconds elapsed since power-up
 
 
 lcd.setCursor(0,1);            // move to the begining of the second line
 lcd_key = read_LCD_buttons();  // read the buttons
 
 switch (lcd_key)               // depending on which button was pushed, we perform an action
 {
   case btnRIGHT:
     {
     lcd.print("RIGHT ");
     break;
     }
   case btnLEFT:
     {
     lcd.print("LEFT   ");
     break;
     }
   case btnUP:
     {
     lcd.print("UP    ");
     break;
     }
   case btnDOWN:
     {
     lcd.print("DOWN  ");
     break;
     }
   case btnSELECT:
     {
     lcd.print("SELECT");
     break;
     }
     case btnNONE:
     {
     lcd.print("NONE  ");
     break;
     }
 } 
}

Cheapest Arduino based robot: parts, examples of use and documentation

This entry is part 3 of 5 in the series Cheapest robot (Arduino)
Ultrasonic Smart Car Kit

Ultrasonic Smart Car Kit

Arduino cheap robot car

Arduino cheap robot car

Funduino Arduino DuemilaNove clon

Funduino Arduino DuemilaNove clon

It’s really cheap but it does not include any documentation; but don’t panic, all you will need can be found on Internet. And now, the main electronic components: the microcontroller, the dual motor driver, the ultrasonic sensor and the servo:

The microcontroller brain is a Funduino (Arduino Duemilanove clone), and as far I’ve used it (and as other buyer said is fully, at least for software, compatible). Here we will not have any problem because there are a lot of documentation about Arduino and Duemilanove.

A simple hello world example (here the file)

// Blinking LED

int ledPin = 13;                 // LED connected to digital pin 13

void setup()
{
  Serial.begin(57600);
  printf ("Setup/n/l");
  Serial.println("Hello world!");
  pinMode(ledPin, OUTPUT);      // sets the digital pin as output
}

void loop()
{
  printf ("2009");
  Serial.println("2009");
  digitalWrite(ledPin, HIGH);   // sets the LED on
  delay(1000);                  // waits for a second
  digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW);    // sets the LED off
  delay(1000);                  // waits for a second
}
Dual_H-Bridge_Motor_Driver

Dual_H-Bridge_Motor_Driver

But to control the two motors this kit use an Dual H-Bridge motor driver (L298). Here (read the Drive Two DC Motors section) you can find a lot of useful documentation and examples, and  here and here you can find also more information, specially about electronics.

Here a file with a simple example, and here another example with speed control

int ENA=5;//connected to Arduino's port 5(output pwm)
int IN1=2;//connected to Arduino's port 2
int IN2=3;//connected to Arduino's port 3
int ENB=6;//connected to Arduino's port 6(output pwm)
int IN3=4;//connected to Arduino's port 4
int IN4=7;//connected to Arduino's port 7

int ledPin = 13;

void blink(int times)
{  
  while (times>0)
  {
    digitalWrite(ledPin, HIGH);   // sets the LED on
    delay(500);                  // waits for a second
    digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW);    // sets the LED off
    delay(500);
    times--;
  }
}

void initialize()
{
  Serial.println("Two motors");

  pinMode(ENA,OUTPUT);
  pinMode(ENB,OUTPUT);
  pinMode(IN1,OUTPUT);
  pinMode(IN2,OUTPUT);
  pinMode(IN3,OUTPUT);
  pinMode(IN4,OUTPUT);

  digitalWrite(ENA,LOW);
  digitalWrite(ENB,LOW);//stop motors

  digitalWrite(IN1,HIGH);
  digitalWrite(IN2,LOW);//setting motorA's forward directon
  digitalWrite(IN3,HIGH);
  digitalWrite(IN4,LOW);//setting motorB's forward directon
}

void setup()
{
  Serial.begin(57600);
  initialize();
}

void loop()
{
  int t=1;
  initialize();

  Serial.println("1 Full forward");
  analogWrite(ENA,255);//start driving motorA
  analogWrite(ENB,255);//start driving motorB

  delay(1000*t);

  Serial.println("2.1 Turning A");

  // Backwards motor A, turning robot
  digitalWrite(IN1,LOW);
  digitalWrite(IN2,HIGH);// setting motorA's backwards directon

  delay(500*t);

  // full forward again
  digitalWrite(IN1,HIGH);
  digitalWrite(IN2,LOW);//setting motorA's forward directon

  delay (1000*t);

  Serial.println("2.2 Turning B");

  // Backwards motor B, turning robot
  digitalWrite(IN3,LOW);
  digitalWrite(IN4,HIGH);//setting motorB's backward directon

  delay(500*t);

  // full forward again
  digitalWrite(IN3,HIGH);
  digitalWrite(IN4,LOW);//setting motorB's forward directon

  delay (1000*t);

  Serial.println("3 Full backward");
  // full backwards
  digitalWrite(IN1,LOW);
  digitalWrite(IN2,HIGH);// setting motorA's backwards directon

  digitalWrite(IN3,LOW);
  digitalWrite(IN4,HIGH);//setting motorB's backward directon

  delay (2000*t);
  // Slowing motors

  Serial.println("4 slowing motors");
  analogWrite (ENA,180);
  analogWrite (ENB,180);
  delay(1000*t);

  Serial.println("5 more slowing motors");
  analogWrite (ENA,110);//stop driving motorA
  analogWrite (ENB,110);//stop driving motorB
  delay(1000*t);

  Serial.println("6 stoping motors");
  analogWrite (ENA,0);//stop driving motorA
  analogWrite (ENB,0);//stop driving motorB

  blink (3);
Ultrasonic sensor hc-sr04

Ultrasonic sensor hc-sr04

The HC-SR04 ultrasonic distance sensor, example of use (here the file):

/*
HC-SR04 Ping distance sensor]
VCC to arduino 5v GND to arduino GND
Echo to Arduino pin 13 Trig to Arduino pin 12
More info at: http://goo.gl/kJ8Gl
*/

#define trigPin 9
#define echoPin 11

void setup() {
  Serial.begin (115200);
  pinMode(trigPin, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(echoPin, INPUT);
}

void loop() {
  int duration, distance;

  digitalWrite(trigPin, HIGH);
  delayMicroseconds(1000);
  digitalWrite(trigPin, LOW);
  duration = pulseIn(echoPin, HIGH);
  distance = (duration/2) / 29.1;
  if (distance > 400 || distance < 0){
    Serial.println("Out of range");
  }
  else {
    Serial.print(distance);
    Serial.println(" cm");
  }

  delay(500);
}

TowerPro micro servo SG90

TowerPro micro servo SG90

And the Tower PRO SG-90 micro servo (and here the file with the example):

// Sweep
// by BARRAGAN <http://barraganstudio.com>
// This example code is in the public domain.

#include

Servo myservo;  // create servo object to control a servo
// a maximum of eight servo objects can be created

int pos = 0;    // variable to store the servo position

void setup()
{
  myservo.attach(3);  // attaches the servo on pin 3 to the servo object
}

void loop()
{
  // goes from 0 degrees to 180 degrees in steps of 1 degree 
  for(pos = 0; pos < 180; pos += 1) {
    myservo.write(pos); // tell servo to go to position in variable 'pos' 
    delay(15); // waits 15ms for the servo to reach the position 
  } 

  for(pos = 180; pos>=1; pos-=1)     // goes from 180 degrees to 0 degrees
  {
    myservo.write(pos);              // tell servo to go to position in variable 'pos'
    delay(15);                       // waits 15ms for the servo to reach the position
  }
}

Soon I will add an LCD display with 6 buttons

Cheapest robotic platform: Smart car

This entry is part 2 of 5 in the series Cheapest robot (Arduino)

[Updated 12/12/2013:
The commented kit is not being sold currently at dx, but it’s sold at Hobby King ]

There are also others kits like:

Funduino Tracking Maze Car for Arduino

Smart Car Chassis Kit for Arduino
]

I have bought the most affordable robotics platform (some photos here) I have found around Internet (at DX): 38€/49$ for all this components:

Ultrasonic Smart Car Kit

My construction:

Arduino cheap robot  car

Arduino cheap robot car

It’s really cheap, all the components work flawlessly and very well but IT DOES NOT INCLUDE ANY DOCUMENTATION and some parts (pan tilt base) are impossible to ensemble (it needs another micro servo, 3€/4$) and there is no way to mount on the robot base. Even that, I Think is a good deal, but you should work to get all the needed information (yes, all needed information is over Internet) and put your imagination to build it. I have used Lego Technics parts to mount the ultrasonic sensor.

Here is all the info I have found for every electronic part, code examples and, of course, (soon) a video.

C. C++, C# robotics programming Workshop/tutorial with the cheapest robotic platform

This entry is part 1 of 5 in the series Cheapest robot (Arduino)
My Smart Car construction

My Smart Car construction

[Update March 30, 2013: Added photo gallery]

I will start a C. C++, C# robotics programming Workshop/tutorial with the cheapest robotic platform I have found at dealextreme.com: (Arduino based) plus a Raspberry Pi (like this that use Bioloid as the hardware platform):

Ultrasonic Smart Car Kit

I have not still received the kit, but I will review the kit and start the workshop as soon as I receive it.

Robotizando un coche teledirigido con Arduino

Esta es la primera entrega de una serie (espero) de ellas sobre cómo hackear un coche teledirigido y ponerle todos los sensores y cacharros que se nos ocurran.

Por supuesto, empezaremos por el principio: cómo hacer que el coche sea autónomo a través de un Arduino. El elegido en este caso es el Arduino Leonardo, pero vale  casi cualquier otro.

Materiales necesarios:

  • Un coche teledirigido baratillo, de los chinos mismo
  • Una placa Arduino
  • Cuatro resistencias (yo usé de 1K, pero valen de un valor +-50%)
  • Estaño
  • Funda termoretráctil
  • Varios cables de colores (a poder ser) de unos 20cm
  • Una batería de 9V

Herramientas necesarias:

  • Estañador
  • Destornillador
  • Pelacables (o una navaja, en su defecto)
  • Alicates de corte diagonal
  • Desoldador de estaño (no imprescindible, pero sí recomendable)

Pasos a seguir:

1. Desmonta el coche

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

2. Desatornilla la placa

Photobucket

3. Elimina el circuito integrado, ya que no lo necesitaremos para nada. Para ello tienes dos opciones:

a) Consigues calentar el estaño de sus patitas y lo sacas como Dios manda o…
b) Con los alicates le cortas las patitas por la parte de arriba y lo sacas con unas pinzas. Yo me he decidido por esta segunda opción. 😉

Photobucket

Éste es el aspecto que mostrará cuando las hayas cortado todas:

Photobucket

Photobucket

4. Prepara las resistencias

Lo que vamos a hacer ahora es proteger nuestra placa, por lo que vamos a coger las cuatro resistencias que tenemos (en mi caso de 1K, pero ya digo que el valor no es crítico, pueden ir desde 0,5K a 1,5K) y cuatro cables de colores de unos 10cm de largo, y los vamos a unir formando binomios resistencia-cable:

Photobucket

Cuando ya tengas las parejas hechas, consolida la unión con estaño.

Photobucket

Las cuatro parejas tendrán este aspecto:

Photobucket

Elimina el trozo sobrante con los alicates de corte.

5. Estudia el circuito integrado que desechaste

Fíjate en las letras impresas que tiene encima para poder Googlearlo. Si has comprado un coche en un chino o en algún sitio por el estilo, seguramente tendrás un integrado como este:

http://jumpjack.altervista.org/digitalrome/progetti/macchinina/TX-2C%28RX-2C%29AY.pdf

Lo que se trata es de buscar a qué corresponde cada pata del integrado para poder controlar nosotros a voluntad el coche. Fïjate que en este pdf aparecen tanto las especificaciones del transmisor (el que está en el mando), como del receptor (que es el que nos interesa). Los pines que estamos buscando son los correspondientes a:

  • Tierra (GND)
  • Derecha (RIGHT)
  • Izquierda (LEFT)
  • Marcha atrás (BACKWARD)
  • Hacia delante (FORWARD)

En mi caso, se trata de los pines 2, 6, 7, 10 y 11.

6. Introduce las parejas que preparaste y el quinto cable en los pines que has identificado

Lo que tienes que hacer ahora es, con ayuda del estañador y el desoldador, eliminar las patitas correspondientes a esos pines para poder introducir las resistencias por los agujeros. Procura limpiar bien la zona con el desoldador para que sea más fácil introducir la pata de la resistencia, aunque ya te digo que yo no tenía y no me costó excesivo trabajo dejar la zona presentable).

A continuación, introduce las cuatro resistencias por los pines correspondientes a las dos marchas y a los lados izquierdo y derecho de la siguiente manera:

Photobucket

Puedes observar que la resistencia queda hacia el lado de arriba, y cómo están limpios y preparados el resto de agujeros. Éste es el aspecto que tiene por debajo:

Photobucket

Una vez introduzcas las cuatro resistencias y el quinto cable que tenías apartado, pero aun no habías usado (es el que va en la patilla de GND, efectivamente), estaña los cinco pines y corta el sobrante tanto de las resistencias como del cable de tierra que te sobrará.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Éste es el aspecto que tendrá tu placa entonces:

Photobucket

7. Protegiendo tu placa

Lo que vas a hacer ahora es proteger esas parejas que hemos introducido con la funda termoretráctil. Para ello corta en varios trozos la funda de tal manera que cada trozo cubra totalmente la resistencia, el trozo estañado y un poco del cable. Unos 10-15 cm, vamos. Y como bien dice su nombre, aplícale calor para que se retraiga y se moldee según la resistencia y el cable. Puedes usar desde un mechero o una cerilla a un secador de pelo. Tú mismo. El objetivo es darle un mejor acabado a las conexiones eléctricas y dotar de protección mecánica y anti-abrasiva a los cables y demás componentes eléctricos.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Éste será el aspecto que tendrá finalmente tu placa.

8. Preparando el Arduino

Si no lo has hecho antes, ahora es el momento de anotar a qué color corresponde cada pin. Puedes hacer una tabla como la siguiente (la que resultó en mi caso):

PIN                  COLOR                  FUNCIÓN

2                               Verde                             GND

6                               Gris                                 Derecha

7                               Azul                                Izquierda

10                            Blanco                           Marcha atrás

11                            Amarillo                       Adelante

El código que vamos a preparar es muy sencillo, ya que únicamente se trata de verificar las cuatro funciones: las dos direcciones marcha atrás y adelante, y los dos lados izquierda y derecha. Se trata del siguiente:

/*
Probando las cuatro órdenes del coche
*/

int forward = 12;  // Forward pin
int reverse = 11;  // Reverse pin
int left = 10;     // Left pin
int right = 9;     // Right pin

void setup()       // Configuración de los pines como salidas
{
pinMode(forward, OUTPUT);
pinMode(reverse, OUTPUT);
pinMode(left, OUTPUT);
pinMode(right, OUTPUT);
}

void go_forward()
{
digitalWrite(forward,HIGH);  // Da la orden de adelante
digitalWrite(reverse,LOW);   // Apaga la orden de marcha atrás
}
void go_reverse()
{
digitalWrite(reverse,HIGH);  // Da la orden de marcha atrás
digitalWrite(forward,LOW);   // Apaga la orden de adelante
}
void stop_car()
{
digitalWrite(reverse,LOW);   // Apaga todas las órdenes
digitalWrite(forward,LOW);
digitalWrite(left,LOW);
digitalWrite(right,LOW);
}
void go_left()
{
digitalWrite(left,HIGH);     // Da la orden de izquierda
digitalWrite(right,LOW);     // Quita la orden de derecha
}
void go_right()
{
digitalWrite(right,HIGH);    // Da la orden de derecha
digitalWrite(left,LOW);      // Quita la orden de izquierda
}

void loop()
{

go_forward();
go_left();
delay(500);

stop_car();
delay(500);

go_reverse();
go_left();
delay(500);

stop_car();
delay(500);

go_forward();
go_right();
delay(500);

stop_car();
delay(500);

go_reverse();
go_right();
delay(500);

stop_car();
delay(500);

}

9. Conectando y probando el Arduino

Y por fin llega el último paso: donde por fin pruebas si todo esto funciona. Elimina la antena del coche si no lo has hecho ya (obviamente, no nos hará falta) y atornilla la placa con los tornillos que quitaste en el paso 2.

Conecta los cables según los pines que has declarado en el programa (en mi caso del 9 al 12) y los colores que anotaste antes. El color de tierra lo llevarás al GND de la placa, que como ves en la foto, está junto a los otros cuatro cables (en mi caso, repito):

Photobucket

Para realizar las pruebas de código, o variaciones, te recomiendo que aun no alimentes la placa con una batería, de tal manera que tendrás que tener la placa accesible al USB. Puedes volver a montar el coche y sujetar la placa con una goma elástica, como en mi caso, o dejarlo ya desmontado para introducir la placa y la batería dentro. Ahí según tu elección.

10. Alimentando la placa

Tan sólo falta el toque final: hacer el coche totalmente autónomo. Con el código ya probado ya sabes que se mueve solo, así que sólo falta el tema de la alimentación. Para ello puedes usar una batería normal de 9V, como esta:

Photobucket

Puedes fijarla tanto en el propio chasis del coche (si tienes sitio), como en la carrocería (algo como esto):

Photobucket

La conexión la puedes realizar con un enchufe centro-positivo en el conector de alimentación de la placa, o con unos simples cables como los ya empleados, insertándolos en los pines GND y Vin del conector POWER de la placa. Según tengas el adaptador o no.

El resultado será algo como esto:

Espero que te haya resultado divertido. Si tienes cualquier pregunta o duda, estamos aquí para ayudarte.

Un saludo y nos vemos en la siguiente entrega! 😀

%d bloggers like this: